Meet The Stars of Desert Hearts this Tonight!
You know it, you love it, now get to meet the stars and director of Desert Hearts this Saturday night! Following a 30th anniversary screening of this ground breaking film at the Museum of Modern Art, stars Helen Shaver and Patricia Charbonneau, along with director Donna Deitch, are coming to Henrietta Hudson for an after party celebration. At a time when lesbians were hardly portrayed at all in cinema, and rarely in a positive way, Desert Hearts came along to shine a light on the beauty of love between two women. It went on to inspire later works and paved the way for more mainstream representation of female love stories. Be a part of celebrating this legacy only at HHNY tonight at 9pm!
03 Dec 2016 in Blog, by
Meet The Stars of Desert Hearts this Saturday Night!
You know it, you love it, now get to meet the stars and director of Desert Hearts this Saturday night! Following a 30th anniversary screening of this ground breaking film at the Museum of Modern Art, stars Helen Shaver and Patricia Charbonneau, along with director Donna Deitch, are coming to Henrietta Hudson for an after party celebration. At a time when lesbians were hardly portrayed at all in cinema, and rarely in a positive way, Desert Hearts came along to shine a light on the beauty of love between two women. It went on to inspire later works and paved the way for more mainstream representation of female love stories. Be a part of celebrating this legacy only at HHNY this Saturday night at 9pm!
01 Dec 2016 in Blog, by
No, Sam Smith Is Not The First Gay Person To Win An Oscar. Here’s A List:
The list of LGBTI winners is actually far bigger than you might expect ‘I read an article a few months ago by Sir Ian McKellen, and he said that no openly gay man had ever won an Oscar, and if this is the case, even if it isn’t the case, I want to dedicate this to the LGBT community all around the world,’ Sam Smith said in his speech when he took home the award for Best Original Song at the Academy Awards. The gay singer, who won for the Spectre theme Writing’s On The Wall, must be feeling slightly embarrassed right now. Not only did he misquote McKellen, who was specifically talking about openly gay people winning Best Actor, but that a number of LGBTI people have won Oscars in the past. And then, when he was told he was not the first gay person to win one, he then said: ‘I had something in my head… I think I’m the secondly openly gay person to win it.’ Wrong again. Here’s a list: Marlon Brando (1954 Best Actor – On The Waterfront) ‘Homosexuality is so much in fashion, it no longer makes news,’ he said in 1976. ‘Like a […]
01 Mar 2016 in Blog, by
Epic Gallery: 150 Years Of Lesbians And Other Lady-Loving-Ladies
I really threw myself into Herstory Month, in June, eating every accessible herstory archive on the internet and spending hours in the library, accumulating massive stacks of borrowed books which I stored at the foot of my bed. My girlfriend was not a big fan of the stacks of books at the foot of the bed. I was looking for words but eventually, also, for pictures. Honestly before tumblr it was difficult to find very much lesbian imagery at all online — it was always the same ten or twelve stock photos — let alone pictures of lesbians taken prior to 2000. I wanted to see an evolution of our community, how we’d grown and changed over the years — and not just in a montage of famous out actresses and models, but pictures of actual people, pictures of women who were active in the community — regular human beings, writers and social activists. So I started collecting them. I scoured tumblr, discovered regional library archives online and visited websites like fuck yeah queer vintage, the new york public library digital archives, out history, and know homo. Unsatisfied with the racial diversity present in the imagery I found online, I began scanning books, screenshotting […]
23 Feb 2016 in Blog, by
Why We Still Need Lesbian Bars in 2016
  Photo by Barbara Alper/Getty Images “What price acceptance?” might be the totem of the LGBT community in the 21st century. The minority community, which is actually comprised of multiple communities, is like any other minority community in the United States determined to garner equal political, social, and economic rights while maintaining its idiosyncratic culture. “Assimilation” is a double-edged sword of cruel optimism: We want to be treated the same and given the same opportunities as others, but we bitterly fear the erasure of differences—cultural differences that establish our communities—in the quest for equality. The promise of acceptance has transmogrified into a resentment of assimilation, and, for lesbians specifically, a lamentation about the nationwide plague of shuttering lesbian bars. Lesbian bars, like any type of commercial establishment, have come and gone over the years. (The one exception seems to be Henrietta Hudson in NYC, the owners of which, I was recently told by co-owner Lisa Cannistraci, just signed a new 15-year lease.) Call it “gentrification,” or what you will; turnover is nothing new when it comes to business. Beyond gentrification, lesbians and other queer women, like those women interviewed in this summer’s viral documentary The Last Lesbian Bars, have rationalized the […]
28 Jan 2016 in Blog, by
National LGBT Museum Sets Its Sights On New York City
Despite years of planning to build in Washington D.C., a proposed National LGBT Museum is now looking to make the Big Apple its home. After leaders discovered that the museum would not be eligible for tax breaks in D.C., and that the attempt to score a location near the National Mall continually turned up unsuccessful, the board turned to New York City as the next best option. “What we found most appealing was opening a museum in our nation’s capital,” said Tim Gold, co-chair of the museum’s board. “When we had to rule out identifying a space near the Mall, it was no longer a museum in the nation’s capital, it was a museum in the city of Washington. And tourism numbers drop off significantly when you go away from the Mall.” An annual survey in Out Traveler has continuously ranked New York as the top gay tourist destination, making the city the perfect new spot for the planned museum. The board currently has three potential sites that they’re looking at, but they’re keeping the locations private for now. “The logistics are more difficult, but the opportunities that we have here are far greater than the opportunities we had in the […]
25 Jan 2016 in Blog, by
The Stonewall Boycotts: Premature or Prejudicial?
As we put this issue of The Advocate to bed (issue 1081, October/November 2015), the trailer for Stonewall was released, and comments and headlines flew around the Web accusing director Roland Emmerich of whitewashing and trans erasure. None of the detractors, at this stage, had seen the film. The film might be great and all-inclusive and true. Or it might not. But at that moment, all of us who decried the content of the film were literally, by definition, prejudiced. We were raving on about a one-minute-long marketing tool, and a marketing tool bedeviling to filmmakers who don’t make them. Soon enough we’ll know more about what’s actually in the film. In the meantime, the uproar is instructive. Here we have the confluence of two conditions that primed us for protest: the legendary importance of the riots, and the mechanisms of hair-trigger social-media-fueled outrage. It was especially bad timing that the Stonewall trailer came out the very day that USC’s Annenberg School put out a study that delineated the overwhelming predominance of white, straight men in film roles. With hashtags, pitchforks, and boycott petitions at the ready, we leapt in. We’re all now primed to lash out at injustice, inspired at least in part by the […]
11 Aug 2015 in Blog, by
“The Outrageous Sophie Tucker” Touches on the Queerness of a Famous 20th Century Performer
Fifty years ago, Sophie Tucker wouldn’t need any introduction. As one of the most famous performers of the early 20th century, Sophie was a touring vocalist and comedian who performed around the world against several odds stacked against her. A large, Jewish mother to a young son, she began singing in amateur vaudeville shows under the condition she would wear blackface, as promoters thought she wasn’t attractive enough for audiences to enjoy her. It didn’t take long for Sophie to prove she was a crowd-pleaser, though, and she was able to do away with the offensive get-up and sing songs she wrote, including “Nobody Loves a Fat Girl, But Oh How a Fat Girl Can Love.” Throughout her almost 60 year long career, she performed with the Ziegfeld Follies, appeared in 11 films and three Broadway shows. Her friends were her fans and vice versa, and because she kept addresses, cards, letters and photographs in scrapbooks, researchers Susan and Lloyd Ecker and filmmaker William Gazecki have a life’s worth of content to include in their new documentary, The Outrageous Sophie Tucker. In the latter half of the film, we find out about Sophie’s many “female companions,” as the legendary performer was married briefly but after separating from her third […]
24 Jul 2015 in Blog, by
Looking Back at Huey Newton’s Thoughts on Gay Rights…In the Wake of Obama’s Endorsement
This was a speech given August 15 1970 by Huey Newton co-founder of the Black Panther Party. Here he addresses the issue of Gay Rights… Its serious food for thought coming in the aftermath of President Obama endorsing Same-sex Message… —- “During the past few years strong movements have developed among women and among homosexuals seeking their liberation. There has been some uncertainty about how to relate to these movements. Whatever your personal opinions and your insecurities about homosexuality and the various liberation movements among homosexuals and women (and I speak of the homosexuals and women as oppressed groups), we should try to unite with them in a revolutionary fashion. I say ” whatever your insecurities are” because as we very well know, sometimes our first instinct is to want to hit a homosexual in the mouth, and want a woman to be quiet. We want to hit a homosexual in the mouth because we are afraid that we might be homosexual; and we want to hit the women or shut her up because we are afraid that she might castrate us, or take the nuts that we might not have to start with. We must gain security in ourselves […]
07 Jul 2015 in Blog, by
Gay Ireland Hails ‘A New Republic’ As Same-Sex Marriage Approved
Gay couples flocked to central Dublin to celebrate a “historic watershed” on Saturday as a large majority in the traditionally Catholic country voted to allow same-sex marriage, the culmination of a four-decade struggle for gay rights. Waving rainbow flags, embracing and crying, two thousand people gathered to watch the official results in the courtyard of Dublin Castle after voters, young and old, accounted for one of the highest turnouts in a referendum for decades. “The amount of people who came out to vote is just such an emotional thing for us,” said Fred Schelbaum, 48, standing with his civil partner Feargal Scott, 43, who he said he intended to marry. “Up to now a lot of gay people felt they were tolerated in Ireland. Now we know that it’s much more than that.” The crowds cheered as gay rights icons appeared on the square, including David Norris, whose campaign led to the 1993 decriminalisation of gay sex and, and Rory O’Neill, whose Panti Bliss drag queen character became the face of the campaign. “The future for young LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender) people in this country is incredible,” O’Neill said. “I’m just glad to be here on the day […]
23 May 2015 in Blog, by